Perpetual quietness of heart.  It is to have no trouble.  It is never to be fretted or vexed, irritable or sore; to wonder at nothing that is done to me, to feel nothing done against me.
It is to be at rest when nobody praises me, and when I am blamed or despised, it is to have a blessed home in myself where I can go in and shut the door and pray to my Father in secret and be at peace, as in a deep sea of calmness, when all around and about is seeming trouble.  C.S. Lewis had the following to say on Pride:

“There is one vice of which no man in the world is free; which every one in the world loathes when he sees it in someone else; and of which hardly any people, except Christians, ever imagine that they are guilty….There is no fault which makes a man more unpopular, and no fault which we are more unconscious of in ourselves, the more we dislike it in others.  The vice I am talking of is Pride or Self-Conceit….Pride is essentially competitive–is competitive by its very nature….Pride gets no pleasure out of having something, only out of having more of it than the next man.  We say that people are proud of being rich, or clever, or good-looking, but they are not.  They are proud of being richer, or cleverer, or better-looking than others….It is the comparison that makes you proud: the pleasure of being above the rest….Pride always means enmity–it is enmity.  And not only enmity between man and man, but enmity to God.  In God you come up against something which is in every respect immeasurably superior to yourself.  Unless you know God as that–and, therefore, know yourself as nothing in comparison–you do not know God at all.  As long as you are proud you cannot know God.  A proud man is always looking down on things and people: and, of course, as long as you are looking down, you cannot see something that is above you.”

 

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