By Hank Hanegraaff

Philosophical naturalists (including most evolutionists) believe that death is the cessation of being.  In their view, humans are merely bodies and brains.  Though they reject metaphysical realities such as the soul, there are convincing reasons to believe that humans have an immaterial aspect to their being that transcends the material and thus can continue to exist after death.

From a legal perspective, if human beings were merely material, they could not be held accountable this year for a crime committed last year, because physical identity changes over time.  We are not the same people today that we were yesterday.  Every day we lose millions of microscopic particles.  In fact, every seven years or so, virtually every part of our material anatomy changes, apart from aspects of our neurological system.  Therefore, from a purely material perspective, the person who previously committed a crime is presently not the same person.  Yet a criminal who attempts to use this line of reasoning as a defense would not get very far.  Such legal maneuvering simply does not fly even in an age of scientific enlightenment.  Legally and intuitively, we recognize a sameness of soul that establishes personal identity over time.

Finally, freedom of the will presupposes that we are more than material robots.  If I am merely material, my choices are a function of such factors as genetic makeup and brain chemistry. Therefore, my decisions are not free; they are fatalistically determined.  The implications of such a notion are profound.  In a worldview that embraces fatalistic determinism, I cannot be held morally accountable for my actions, since reward and punishment make sense only if we have freedom of the will.  In a solely material world, reason itself is reduced to the status of a conditioned reflex.  Moreover, the very concept of love is rendered meaningless.  Rather than being an act of the will, love is relegated to a robotic procedure that is fatalistically determined by physical processes.

While the legal and freedom arguments are convincing in and of themselves, there is an even more powerful and persuasive argument demonstrating the reality of life beyond the grave. That argument flows from the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  The best minds of ancient and modern times have demonstrated beyond the shadow of a doubt that Christ’s physical trauma was fatal; that the empty tomb is one of the best-attested facts of ancient history; that Christ’s followers experienced on several occasions tangible post-resurrection appearances of Christ; and that within weeks of the resurrection, not just one, but an entire community of at least 3,000 Jews experienced such an incredible transformation that they willingly gave up sociological and theological traditions that had given them their national identity.

Through the resurrection, Christ not only demonstrated that He does not stand in a line of peers with Abraham, Buddha, or Confucius but also provided compelling evidence for life after death.

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